Posts Tagged ‘performance management’

Some would call my interest in the open data movement an obsession – and I guess they’re probably right. I’m convinced that once we open up all proprietary and closed data we’ll be unleashing one of the biggest, unresolved potentials in the world today.

My inspirations are Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the world wide web and linked data protagonist), Tim O’Reilly (open data and open source visionary), Hans Rosling (professor of global health and data visualization guru) and I admire the efforts of the likes of Streetfilms, who brilliantly document open data success stories in urban environments.

Here’s my current favourite video selection. Let me know if I need to add other shots to my Delicious.

Tim Berners-Lee on the next web

Tim O’Reilly’s speech at Gov 2.0 Expo 2010 – Government as a platform

Tim Berners-Lee: The year open data went worldwide

My favourite Hans Rosling TED talk

Streetfilms’ Open data in transit

Last year I wrote about motivation and Daniel Pink’s Ted video in which he revealed the blatant discrepancy between what science knows and what business does. I was puzzled because I, too, had been lulled into believing in sticks and carrots – so-called extrinsic motivation, which just doesn’t work and in many cases might even be counter-productive.

I promised myself to start looking for evidence of Pink’s assertions and, man, did I find it. My guess is I have had at least 100 conversations about motivation since then: With business leaders, parents, colleagues, my wife, my kids and teachers. I also recently finished reading Daniel Pink’s new book “Drive” and I was pleased to discover that it’s truly an abundance of wisdom about motivation – what motivates, what doesn’t, toolkits, suggested readings and a whole lot more. Highly recommended.

Here’s a 40-minute video in which Pink talks about intrinsic motivation based on “Drive”. Please let me know what you think motivates.

What I consider to be one of the key benefits of social media in organizations is this: It takes communications and collaboration into a whole new era.

But what if we’re not ready to take that plunge? Do we first need to declutter in order to reap the benefits of social media? I’m afraid yes. I have previously written about email being one of the biggest productivity barriers of our time. Well, how did email go from being the biggest thing since sliced bread (just 10-15 years ago) to becoming a real addictive nuisance to a lot of people? Well, like so many other addictions it’s difficult to deal with it rationally – simply because it’s all about brain chemistry. It’s not that we don’t understand the addictive nature of it, we just can’t help ourselves because we neeeed that dopamine rush.

So what’s the effect of adding a whole series of new social tools into the picture? Judging by consumer web 2.0 tools like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube things are probably not getting any simpler. My experience is that this generation of social tools is every bit as addictive as email (which can be both good and bad).

Life hacks

This is where life hacks will save you. According to Wikipedia “life hack refers to productivity tricks that programmers devise and employ to cut through information overload and organize their data”, however today “anything that solves an everyday problem in a clever or non-obvious way might be called a life hack”.

One of my favourite life hacks is still the one presented in Merlin Mann’s speech at the Google Tech Talks in 2007. It’s very very simple and yet not that many people actually do it. The clip takes almost an hour, but I tell you, it’s gonna be one of the best hours you’ve spent in a long time.

But I want to go one step further. I want companies to life-hack their inboxes and make room for some of the productivity-enhancing, joy-spreading and innovation-creating Enterprise 2.0 tools. And then I want them to life-hack their Enterprise 2.0 tools. I call it Digital Habits 2.0.

Last week I took part in a great Enterprise 2.0 conference in Copenhagen and it gave me a brilliant opportunity to talk to dozens of Enterprise 2.0 practitioners from industry and organizations – and, of course, the ‘gurus’ :)

A very common challenge among practitioners is the executive sponsorship – (ahem) or lack thereof. Even in companies which I would consider really having a finger on the pulse and being social media leaders, practitioners report lack of C-level sponsorship, lack of interest and, not least, lack of money. These are the same decision-makers who regularly fund ERP projects with seven or eight figure budgets. My conclusion, at this stage, is that top executives are still largely ignorant about Enterprise 2.0 terminologies and, at best, they are only vaguely familiar with terms like Enterprise 2.0, corporate social media, social computing, microblogging and wikis. At worst, they consider them a waste of time and believe we’re talking about Facebook.

But just like any other sound business decision, a decision to deploy corporate social media needs to be based on a sound business case. This is the merciless truth about corporate sponsorships and bags of cash to follow.

Drivers

Let’s look at some of the drivers. According to social media guru Suw Charman-Anderson, 38% of all employees get more than 100 emails a day, 13% more than 250 emails and 20% spend more than 4 hours a day sifting through emails. We check our emails on average every 5 minutes and it takes us 64 seconds to get our train of thought back on track after we deal with email. This means we spend 48 days a year figuring out what we were just doing. Email is quickly becoming the number one productivity obstacle. An organizational dinosaur. 1-0. Go figure out how much productivity potential lies in driving communication and collaboration from email to social media in your organization.

A recent study by the INSEAD and Wharton business schools provided overwhelming evidence that virtual brainstorming, or distributed idea generation as it’s also known as (e.g. wikis), outperforms actual face-to-face brainstorming. Let’s think about that one. “This has significant managerial implications: if the interactive build-up [of team brainstorming] is not leading to better ideas, an organization might be better off relying on asynchronous idea generation by individuals using, for example, web-based idea management systems.” So if your organization is focused on innovation, this is the way to go. 2-0 and it’s not even half time.

Bottom line, companies are beginning to reap major benefits in terms of higher revenues (through shared external networks), faster time to market (through more effective collaboration and innovation), lower employee turnover (through better talent attraction and retention) and higher productivity (through less duplication of efforts). The list goes on.

In the words of one of my Twitter followers:

“It’s certainly interesting to see what social computing can do for our existing organizations, but it’s even more interesting to see what organizations we can build with social computing”.

Let’s build your business case!

Citatet er fra AIIM’s undersøgelse Collaboration and Enterprise 2.0 fra slutningen af 2009 og det er et citat, som jeg, siden jeg læste undersøgelsen, vender tilbage til igen og igen.

For det første er det hovedrystende sandt. Kender vi efterhånden ikke alle den situation, at vi i vores arbejdsvirke må nøjes med inferiøre værktøjer i forhold til dem, vi er blevet vant til på internettet? Vi er blevet vant til Web 2.0-universet, hvad enten vi kender begrebet eller ej, og muligheden for at kunne søge og finde alt på et splitsekund, at kommentere på venners Facebook-status, på deres Twitter-update, på LinkedIn. Vi ved efterhånden mere detaljeret, hvad vores venner i udlandet laver LIGE NU end vores kollega 10 meter længere henne.

Jeg har haft dette oppe i mine diskussioner med adskillige store og små danske virksomheder i løbet af de sidste 2 måneder og reaktionen er, næsten over en bred kam, at det er så sandt, så sandt og at de fleste faktisk meget gerne vil gøre noget ved det. Ikke kun fordi der efterhånden er ved at opstå et medarbejderpres, men også fordi det giver forretningsmæssigt voldsomt god mening.

Hvis nogen af jer kender Gmail, så ved I, at man nu modtager kontekstrelaterede Google Adwords, mens man læser emails. Hvis jeg fx læser en email fra min kone, hvor hun foreslår en lille sviptur til Paris (gid hun gjorde), så handler reklamerne i højre side om feriehuse i Frankrig, billige flybilletter til Paris osv. Dvs. jeg får ”pushed” relevant information lige ind i mit synsfelt.

Jeg forestiller mig, at virksomheder på samme måde skaber platforme, der ”pusher” helt konkret kontekstrelevant information til sine medarbejdere på tværs af applikationer både inden for firewallen og fra skyen. Så slipper man for, at det samme projekt uafhængigt af hinanden igangsættes 3 gange i samme organisation inden for blot 18 måneder og forventningerne er øget produktivitet, øget arbejdsglæde, øget videndeling – og øget Return On Information.

Hvad er jeres tanker om dette og har I taget initiativer i denne retning?

Warning: The following statement is rubbish. As soon as you’ve read it, please erase it from your memory :)

“Twitter and social networks cost UK businesses over £1.38 billion per year in lost productivity”. This recent quote from a survey by Morse, a UK based IT consulting company, doesn’t even deserve to be referenced, except it has now appeared in newspapers worldwide. Companies who wish to lose their employee mojo, go ahead and follow Morse’s advice. Those who want to continue to attract the Y Generation, the Digital Natives, forget you ever read that statement.

As I have already mentioned in my earlier blogs about the topic, Digital Natives, and the rest of us really, expect to be able to check our Facebooks, our online bank account statements and book our weekend trips any time we want. But hold on, we also prepare customer presentations at 11 o’clock at night. We do that if we’re passionate about our jobs.

The real world example is Google and their 20 percent time. Google offers their engineers “20-percent time” so that they’re free to work on what they’re really passionate about. Google Suggest, AdSense for Content and Orkut are among the many products of this perk.

Just consider this: How many hours of lost productivity do you think Google has each year on that account? It’s around $400,000,000. And do you think Google considers it “lost productivity”? Or is it their mojo?

I recently watched this video with Daniel Pink. And since then I have been thinking about the real impact of what he’s saying, which is basically this: If your job involves a minimum of cognitive skills, most performance management methods, systems and approaches don’t work. There’s a mismatch between what science knows and what businesses do. Mind-buggling and it really calls for action (or corrective action as we consultants like to call it). Go ahead and watch it. Trust me – it’s worth investing a little time in.

My promise: I intend to find out to what extent this is true, to what extent corporation know about this and to what extent they intend to do something about it.

Until then… these are the 3 motivational words to remember: Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose.